Scientific Program

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Day 2 :

Keynote Forum

Josef Holzki

University Children´s Hospital, Belgium

Keynote: Do new publications on the anatomy of the larynx of neonates and infant help to prevent intubation injury?

Time : 9.00 to 9.30

OMICS International Pediatric Nursing-2016 International Conference Keynote Speaker Josef Holzki photo
Biography:

Dr Josef Holzki is a teaching professor at the University Children´s Hospital Liège, Belgium, after retiring from being Director/Chairman of the department of Pediatric Anesthesia and Surgical Intensive Care Unit (SICU) in Children´s Hospital Cologne, Germany for 23 years. He also served as a President of the FEAPA (Federation of European associations of Pediatric Anesthesia), Lecturer in international meetings of Pediatric Anesthesia and –intensive care and airway endoscopy, honorary member of the Association of Pediatric anesthesia of Great Britain and Ireland (APA).

Abstract:

To give a convincing overview of the pediatric larynx we have to rely on anatomical findings depicting the funnel (conical) shape of the unyielding cartilaginous structures (1) with the apex at the outlet of the larynx (2). However, the distensible part of the larynx, consisting of glottis and anterior wall superior of the arch of the cricoid cartilage, are not convincingly described yet because radiological methods (MRI and CT-scans) cannot demonstrate the distention of this part which occurs during every intubation. These two aspects of the larynx can lead to controversial discussions which affect the work of nurses how to deal with tracheal tube care.rnAirway endoscopy with small endoscopic lenses (type Hopkins) can visualize glottis, sub-glottis space and the narrow outlet of the cricoid ring during spontaneous breathing under anesthesia, confirming rigid anatomical and distensible structures of the larynx. Simultaneous documentation of airway injury leads to desirable early treatment. rnNewer studies, relying on MRI and CT-scans without accompanying endoscopy (3) might lead to inadequate interpretation of their findings in relation to intubation trauma.rnrnVideo-laryngoscopy as a first step to establish endoscopic technology to visualize the intubation procedure can help to prevent airway injury.rn

OMICS International Pediatric Nursing-2016 International Conference Keynote Speaker Luis Beato-Fernández photo
Biography:

Luis Beato-Fernández (MD. PhD.) has completed his MD from University of Seville (Spain) and postdoctoral studies PhD from University of Cordoba School of Medicine. He is the director of Eating Disorders Unit at the General Hospital of Ciudad Real and he is professor at the School of Medicine University of Castilla La Mancha. He has published more than 25 papers mainly related to Eating Disorders in adolescents.

Abstract:

Up to 40% of patients who suffer from an Eating Disorders have comorbid symptoms of low mood. Personality dimensions and family relationships could be related to depressive mood and constitute a risk factor for depression in EDs. The aims were to see which temperament and character dimensions were associated with depression, controlling the influence of parental rearing styles, mainly with its outcome at two-year follow up in eating disorders (EDs). We also studied the relationship of these variables with self-esteem and anxiety. Methods: Participants (N=94) had 28 Anorexia nervosa (AN), 38 Bulimia nervosa (BN) and 28 Eating disorders not otherwise specified (EDNOS). The Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), State and Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI), Rosenberg Self Esteem Questionnaire (RSE), Eating Disorder Inventory (EDI-2), Temperament and Character Inventory (TCI) and the EMBU (Swedish acronym for ‘My memories of upbringing’) were administered. Results: Depression at the beginning (t0) was severe in 22% of the cases. Harm Avoidance and Novelty Seeking had an effect on depressed mood at t0, mediated by Ineffectiveness. Responsibility (SD1) was associated with scores on the BDI at two years follow up (ß=-0.37, 95% CI -2.6, -0.6, p<0.01). However we didn't find any relationship between the EMBU and BDI scores one and two years later. Conclusion: Low mood in EDs could be more related to personality dimensions than factors related to "upbringing" and enhancing self-efficacy and self-directness is crucial for a good clinical outcome.

  • Pediatric Healthcare
Speaker

Chair

Josef Holzki

University Childrens Hospital, Belgium

Speaker

Co-Chair

Arthur Engler

University of Connecticut, USA

Speaker
Biography:

Dr. MacDonald completed a Master’s degree in Nursing at the University of Toronto, Canada and a PhD at the University of Manchester in the UK. Currently she is a Professor in the Faculty of Nursing at the University of New Brunswick (Canada). Dr. MacDonald’s doctoral work examined respite for parents who were caring for children who required complex care. This paper comes from that work. Dr. MacDonald has three children of her own.

Abstract:

Advances in nursing and medical care augmented by developments in pharmaceutical and health technologies have led to an increasing number of children who require complex care at home. Parents are their caregivers. In an attempt to learn more about this caregiving role and how the parents accessed respite an ethnographic study consisting of 47 participants: 19 mothers; 4 fathers; 7 grandparents, 13 nurses; and 4 social workers was undertaken. One of the key categories that emerged from the data was Fair Play. Data collection included in-depth interviews, participant observation, and a document review. All of the participants were interviewed using a question guide that resulted in a conversational approach. Participant observation occurred in the homes of the children as well as in respite facilities. Documents such as respite policies and the carers Act were reviewed in detail. Four themes emerged from the data: Parents Caring; Caring and the Impact on Parental Identity; The Nature of Respite; and Fair Play. Fair Play will be discussed here. According to the Oxford Dictionary Fair play means “reasonable treatment or behavior.” To the parents in this study Fair play was “a sense of give and take.” Fair play is a desired outcome in the struggle to provide respite care in an environment in which the rules are not only unspoken, but vary between the players; and where breaking the rules may provide more gains than being cooperative. The key categories within Fair play are: • Care Obligations • Feelings of Entitlement • Respite Information Needs • Ongoing Support Needs • Negotiating the System • Equity

Speaker
Biography:

Dr. Kendra Russell serves as Associate Professor and Director of the Macon Graduate Center at Georgia College. She completed her BSN and MSN in Nursing Administration at Georgia College and Doctorate in Nursing at Georgia State University, Atlanta, Ga. Dr. Russell’s clinical background is in neonatal intensive care and pediatrics. Dr. Russell’s research focus is in maternal/infant outcomes and she has published and presented her research at local, state, national, and international conferences. She has eight years of administrative experience serving as a RN-BSN program coordinator, department chair – undergraduate nursing, and assistant director of nursing.

Abstract:

Bedside nurses are expected to translate the best research into practice to provide the highest quality and level of care. Premature births are a global issue with the highest rates occurring in countries with limited resources and high poverty. Although there have been slight improvements in these rates, medical care has focused on improving survivability. A number of these infants face deficits in vision, hearing, cognition, and musculoskeletal development. These deficits, especially in low birth weight (<2500 grams) and very low birth weight (<1500) infants, may have long term effects.exhibited in disorders such attention deficit disorder, learning disabilities. Neuroprotective care is a developing science and is an essential component of providing care that promotes, stability and regulation, brain development, and attachment. Research has shown promise in these areas and the results of two studies will be explored as well as future indications for non-invasive hemodynamic monitoring with premature infants. Practice aimed at providing support for optimal short and long-term outcomes will conversely decrease the morbidities continuing to occur within this vulnetable population.

Speaker
Biography:

Dr. Ashlea Cardin has been a pediatric and neonatal occupational therapist at Mercy Kids Hospital, Springfield, MO, USA, for over 16 years. She is Board Certified in Pediatrics by the American Occupational Therapy Association, is certified to administer the Neonatal Oral Motor Assessment Scale, is designated as a Neonatal Developmental Care Specialist by the National Association of Neonatal Nurses, and serves as a consultant for Philips Healthcare’s Global Wee Care Program. Dr. Cardin is also an Assistant Professor of Occupational Therapy at Missouri State University, teaching pediatrics, research, and theory courses.

Abstract:

American author Leo Buscaglia once stated that “Too often we underestimate the power of a touch, a smile, a kind word, a listening ear, an honest compliment, or the smallest act of caring, all of which have the potential to turn a life around.” This quote rings especially true for skilled healthcare professionals working in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) setting. In preparation for the departure from an older, traditional open-bay NICU to a newly-designed unit comprised of single-family rooms, Mercy Kids Hospital (Springfield, Missouri, USA), NICU co-workers sought transformation: of caregiving attitudes, care practice, and outcomes for hospitalized infants and their families. Beyond identifying what equipment should be transferred to the new unit, team members in the NICU at Mercy-Springfield began examining what aspects of care should be transferred as well – or possibly left behind. NICU staff verbalized a desire to change not only the physical environment, but also their culture of caregiving by embarking on a journey toward improved neuroprotective family-centered developmentally supportive care. Utilizing the Neonatal Integrative Developmental Care Model (Altimier & Phillips, 2013) as a framework, Mercy-Springfield identified specific goals and aim statements within each of the model's seven core measures. The purpose of this presentation is to explicate how Mercy-Springfield used this model to (1) critically and honestly reflect on current care practice, and the (2) transform the NICU environment, increase family partnership in caregiving, improve positioning and handling practice, safeguard infant sleep, minimize infant stress and pain, protect skin integrity, and optimize nutrition.

Speaker
Biography:

Dr Salah T. Al Awaidy is a Communicable Diseases Adviser in Health Affairs, Ministry of Health, Muscat, Oman. He is a medical doctor and holds a Master’s in Epidemiology. He is currently the adviser on Communicable Disease Surveillance, Elimination and Eradication of Communicable Diseases of Public Health Importance, EPI, vaccine supply chain system and IHR at the Ministry of Health, Oman. He was the Director of Communicable Disease Surveillance and Control at MoH, HQ, Oman between 1997-2011, IHR national focal point 2002-2013 and was a member in several of the professional committees namely: Strategic Advisory Group on Immunization (SAGE), WHO Geneva (2005-2007); Strategic Advisor Group on Vaccine and Store Management Training Courses (2005-2008), WHO Geneva; Strategic TB Advisory Board (STAG) 2007-2011 2014- till date.

Abstract:

Background: Rotavirus gastroenteritis (RGE) is the leading cause of diarrhea in young children in Oman, incurring substantial healthcare and economic burden. We propose to formally assess the potential cost effectiveness of implementing universal vaccination with a pentavalent rotavirus vaccine (RV5) on reducing the health care burden and costs associated with rotavirus gastroenteritis (RGE) in Oman Methods: A Markov model was used to compare two birth cohorts, including children who were administered the RV5 vaccination versus those who were not, in a hypothetical group of 65,500 children followed for their first 5 years of life in Oman. The efficacy of the vaccine in reducing RGE-related hospitalizations, emergency department (ED) and office visits, and days of parental work loss for children receiving the vaccine was based on the results of the Rotavirus Efficacy and Safety Trial (REST). The outcome of interest was cost per quality-adjusted life year (QALY) gained from health care system and societal perspectives. Results: A universal RV5 vaccination program is projected to reduce, hospitalizations, ED visits, outpatient visits and parental work days lost due to rotavirus infections by 89%, 80%, 67% and 74%, respectively. In the absence of RV5 vaccination, RGE-related societal costs are projected to be 2,023,038 Omani Rial (OMR) (5,259,899 United States dollars [USD]), including 1,338,977 OMR (3,481,340 USD) in direct medical costs. However, with the introduction of RV5, direct medical costs are projected to be 216,646 OMR (563,280 USD). Costs per QALY saved would be 1,140 OMR (2,964 USD) from the health care payer perspective. An RV5 vaccination program would be considered cost saving, from the societal perspective. Conclusions: Universal RV5 vaccination in Oman is likely to significantly reduce the health care burden and costs associated with rotavirus gastroenteritis and may be cost-effective from the payer perspective and cost saving from the societal perspective.

Speaker
Biography:

Mrs. Zehra AYDIN was born in Iğdır, Turkey in 1986. She is a PhD student in Istanbul University Institute of Health Science. She has been working in Hitit University Health School since 2013.

Abstract:

This study was designed and carried out to determine the attitude of mothers with 0-6 years old children towards safety measures taken against home accidents and the effects of home accidents training on mothers’ knowledge level. The study has been carried out in the city of Çorum in Turkey between the dates of 20.11.14-03.03.15. 200 mothers who had kindergarten children in the age group of 0-6 and who agreed to take part in the study were included and constituted the study sample. The data of the study was collected by using Questionnaire Survey Data and applying the Scale for Identification of the Safety Measures Taken by Mothers to Prevent Home Accidents of Children in the 0-6 age group. It was determined that there is a statistically significant difference between the income level of mothers, family type, accident status of children and the obtained point average from the scale (p<0.01). While the scale point average before training (BT) was 70.95±13.41 the point average after training (AT) has been identified as 151.72±61.67. It was determined that the difference of point averages between BT and AT is statistically significant (p<0.001). The training for the prevention of home accidents provided to mothers has led to an increase in knowledge on this topic and it has been determined that mothers whose children had an accident before have gained experience as a result of those accidents. Therefore it is highly recommended to increase the awareness of mothers on the prevention of home accidents.

Speaker
Biography:

Nasim Alsebai MD, pediatric surgeon, anatomist, researcher and lecturer,I have graduated from Faculty of Medicine - Aleppo University at the age of 22,I have done the Pediatric Surgery Residency Training in Syria from Aleppo University Hospital - Faculty of Medicine where I got the master degree in Surgery - Pediatric Surgery, and this followed by Master of Science degree in Human Anatomy from the Anatomy Department - Aleppo University. I am currently working as an Anatomy lecturer in the College of Medical & Health Sciences in Emirates College of Technology, Abu Dhabi. I have worked in UAE over the last years in both clinical and faculty positions. I am actively involved in clinical research and academic publications.

Abstract:

There is no dietary requirement for taurine, since the body can make it out of vitamin B6 and the amino acids methionine and cysteine. Taurine found in high concentration levels in various tissues of humans, Including in the nervous system and muscles, taurine is one of the most abundant amino acid derivatives in the body. It is thought to help regulate heartbeat, maintain cell membranes, and affect the release of neurotransmitters (chemicals that carry signals between nerve cells) in the brain. Deficiencies occasionally occur in vegetarians, whose diets may not provide the building blocks for making taurine, one of the building blocks of proteins. Taurine conjugates with bile acids to form bile salts that are needed for fatty acid absorption. Although glycine can also conjugate with bile acids, taurine conjugates predominate in human milk fed preterm infants during early infancy. Taurine insufficiency is associated with impaired bile acid secretion, reduced absorption or fat and fat-soluble vitamins (particularly vitamin D), abnormal hepatic function, and hepatic cholestasis associated with prolonged administration of parenteral nutrition in preterm infants. Evidence exists that taurine has important roles in intestinal fat absorption, hepatic function, and auditory and visual development in preterm or low birth weight infants. Observational data suggest that relative taurine deficiency during the neonatal period is associated with adverse long-term neurodevelopmental outcomes in preterm infants. Taurine is also reported to improve maturation of ABER in pre-term infants and has a role in osmoregulation of CNS and may act as neuroinhibitor. Taurine is the most abundant free amino acid in breast milk in the human. Indeed, It is reported that the cows' milk samples were relatively low in taurine compared to the breast milk samples of human. Also it suggested that taurine plays an important role in learning, Therefore, we suggest that taurine supplementation for preterm or low birth weight infants on growth and development should be taken in considerations

  • Pediatric Respiratory Alterations
Speaker

Chair

Josef Holzki

University Childrens Hospital, Belgium

Speaker

Co-Chair

Arthur Engler

University of Connecticut, USA

Session Introduction

Sunil Jatana

Melaka Manipal Medical College, Malaysia

Title: Controlled Oxygen Therapy To Neonates By Oxygenhood In The Absence Of Oxygen Analyser
Speaker
Biography:

He has done MBBS and Post-graduation (MD) in Paediatrics, from Armed Forces Medical College, Poona University, India. He has served in various teaching and other hospitals of Armed Forces, India for 36 years followed by Professor Paediatrics in D. Y. Patil Medical College, Pune, India and currently working as Professor Paediatrics in Melaka Manipal Medical College, Malaysia. He is a recognized Undergraduate & Postgraduate Teacher and examiner MBBS, DCH & MD of various universities in India. He was the executive editor of Medical Journal Armed Forces India in the past & and is a referee for 2 Medical Journals in India. He has published 15 papers and presented many papers and chaired scientific sessions in National conferences. He is a member of Indian Academy of Paediatrics and has been a Member of Executive Board, Indian Academy of Paediatrics in 2011. undergraduate pediatric nursing program and the author of numerous papers on pediatric and neonatal nursing.

Abstract:

Background: A study was conducted to evaluate and to evolve a system of standardizing the oxygen concentration inside the oxygen hood and to develop guidelines for controlled FiO2 administration by changing size of the hood, lid position on the hood and the oxygen flow rate, without an oxygen analyzer. The effect of low flow rates on carbon dioxide (CO2) retention inside the head box was also studied. Design settings & method: A dummy patient and thirty neonates, requiring oxygen to be delivered through head box, constituted the material for the study group. Oxygen content in the head box was measured using a standard oxygen analyzer while the size of head box; flow rate and lid position were changed independently and in combination. The head boxes were tested on a dummy patient. These results were analyzed, a general guideline derived, and were applied to thirty neonates requiring oxygen therapy using head box. Multiple readings were taken. Data thus collected was tabulated, statistically analyzed, and appropriate conclusions drawn. Results: Volume of headbox had an inverse relation with the oxygen concentration inside the headbox. A smaller sized headbox achieved better & more predictable oxygen concentration at all flow rates. Maximum difference in oxygen concentration by varying the lid position was observed in the large headbox. Keeping the variables constant, oxygen concentration was lower in babies as compared to dummy, which is statistically significant. No significant CO2 retention was found at flow rate of 4 L/pm in a small & 3 L/pm in a medium & large head box respectively. Conclusion: It is possible to predict the oxygen concentration inside the head box depending upon various variables without the use of oxygen analyzer. Larger the size of the head box and higher the lid position, lesser the oxygen concentration achieved at a given oxygen flow rate. Oxygen concentration achieved in babies is lesser than the concentration achieved in a dummy. Flow rates of less than 4L/pm in small & 3 L/pm in medium & large sized head boxes are associated with CO2 retention.

Speaker
Biography:

Dina Kamal is an Assistant Professor of Pediatric Pulmonology, Cairo University working as a Pediatric consultant, Astoon Hospital, al khobar, KSA. She was graduated in 1998 from Department of Medicine, Cairo University. She continued her post graduate studies got my master degree from Cairo University at 2003 and joined the academic work as assistant lecturer, later as a lecturer in pediatrics at Cairo University. She continued her academic work at Cairo University and got M.D. Degree of Pediatric Pulmonology in October 2007. In 2012 she was promoted as an assistant professor in the department of pediatric pulmonology, Cairo University and up to now. She is interested in studying and teaching pulmonary function in infants and did a lot of studies in the field of pulmonary function in infants by using infant plethysmography and published a lot of research papers in the past few years.

Abstract:

Introduction Acute lower respiratory tract infection in children causes significant morbidity in the developing countries. Documentation of virus infection using PCR and clinical characteristics of patients affected with viral pneumonia are reviewed in this study. Methods 51 children less than three years admitted to the Pediatric Hospital, Cairo University with viral pneumonia were included. All patients had undergone nasopharyngeal aspirate for PCR viral detection. Results A total of 51 cases were enrolled in the study, of which 7 cases were negative while 44 children were positive for viruses. The most common respiratory virus was Rhinovirus in 32 patients (72.2%), then parainfluenza virus (PIV) in 12 (27.3%), of which subtypes PIV1 were 2 (4.5%), PIV3 were 5 (11.4%) and PIV4 were 5 (11.4%) cases. The third common viruses were respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) in 9 (20.5%) cases of which 3 (6.8%) were RSVA and 6 (13.6%) were RSVB and adenovirus in 9 cases (20.5%). Boca virus was found in 8 (18.2%) patients, corona virus 2 (4.5%) patients, H1N1 2 (4.5%) patients, enterovirus 2 patients (4.5%) and human metapneumovirus in one case (2.3%). Influenza B and PIV2 were not detected. Coinfection was found in 28 (63.7%). Mortality occurred in 12 (23.5%). There was no significant relation between virus type or coinfection with disease severity. Conclusions RV was the most commonly detected virus in children under 3 years admitted with acute lower respiratory tract infections. Coinfection was present in the majority of our patients; however it was not related significantly to parameters of disease severity.

  • Pediatric Nutrition and Elimination
Speaker

Chair

Kendra Russell

Middle Georgia State University, USA

Speaker

Co-Chair

Victoria Munoz Martinez

Ciudad Real University Hospital, Spain

Speaker
Biography:

Victoria Muñoz Martinez ( MD) has completed his MD from University of Castilla La Mancha (Albacete, Spain) and nowdays is working at her PhD with Dr. Luis Beato. She is working as a Infant and Adolescent Psychiatry at the General Hopsital of Ciudad Real. She also collaborates with the School of Medicine at the University of Castilla La Mancha.

Abstract:

Introdiuction: It is known that patients with an Eating Disorder (ED) present difficulties to collaborate with the treatment, both at the beginning and in the end. This is an important aspect because it influence at the outcome. Different studies also demonstrated the relationship between parental bonding and eating disorders. This study presents the relationship “perceived rearing styles” and ‘‘attitude towards change’’ among eating disorder patients considering the diagnosis criteria of DSM-IV-TR (American Psychiatric Association -APA-, 1994). Methods: One hundred and sixty-six eating disorder patients were divided into three groups according the DSM-IV-TR criteria: 66 (39.8%) patients met criteria for bulimia nervosa, 49 (29.5%) patients met criteria for anorexia nervosa and 51 (30.7%) patients met criteria for an eating disorder not otherwise specified. All of them were evaluated for family relationship (APGAR familiar), their attitudes towards change (ACTA) and their memories of parental upbringing EMBU after one year of treatment. Results: A multiple regression analysis was performed. The find of the research showed that patients with ED and high Scores in ‘’overprotection’’ perceived during childhood showed higher levels in ‘‘pre-contemplation’’ and lower scores in ‘‘action’’ and ‘’maintenance’’. Regarding , ‘‘rejection’’ during upbringing was directly correlated with higher scores in ‘‘pre-contemplation’’ at one year follow-up regardless of family dysfunction. At least, ‘‘warm’’ perceived was related to higher scores in ‘‘action’’. Conclusions: Highlight the novel part of this study who shown the relationship between parental rearing styles and motivation to change. The results suggest how parental bonding is associated with motivation to change in eating disorders and also influences at the outcome of these patients.

Speaker
Biography:

Assist. Prof. Dr. Selen OZAKAR AKCA was born in Samsun, Turkey in 1980. She received her PhD degree from Istanbul University Institute of Health Science with the thesis entitled “Risk-Taking Behaviours of Adolescents and The Effect of Nursing Practice on Substance Abuse in Accordance With Model of Change in Adolescents” in 2013. She has been working in Hitit University Health School since 2008. She is married and has a son.

Abstract:

Anemia is defined as a reduction of red cell mass in hematocrit or milliliter in blood hemoglobin concentration and thus results in a reduction of oxygen carrying capacity and the amount of oxygen that reach the tissues. Anemia is a disease affecting many hematological and non-hematologic systems. Therefore it leads to biochemical changes in cellular functions and has effects on growth, psychomotor and mental development, behavior, immune-gastrointestinal system, physical capacity and thermoregulation. According to the data of the World Health Organization (WHO) anemia is a prevalent health problem that leads to increased morbidity and mortality of especially pre-school children. Anemia is recognized as a major health problem due to the negative effects on the mental and physical development during childhood. With this study it was aimed to determine the anemia status of children visiting the kindergarten affiliated to Çorum Directorate of Education with non-invasive method and to investigate the effects of anemia on physical, mental and neuromotor development of children. While the status of anemia has been evaluated by using a non-invasive measurement device the data of the study has been collected by filling out Questionnaires, Evaluation forms of children’s physical development and Denver Developmental Screening Test II. According to the results obtained from the study it is seen that anemia and malnutrition could have a negative impact on children’s neuromotor development.

Hala Mohamed Shalaby

Riyadh Care Hospital, Saudi Arabia

Title: Breast Feeding
Speaker
Biography:

Dr Hala Mohamed Shalaby is a Pediatric & Neonatology Specialist in Riyadh Care Hospital, Saudi Arabia since 2001. She did her M.B.B.CH in 1989 and Post graduate Diploma (DCH) in General Pediatric, MRCPCH of Pediatric & Child Health in 2015. She worked as Intern (House officer) at Zagizag University, Egypt (1990-1991), General Practitioner (1991-1992) Egypt, Pediatric Resident (1992-1994), Egypt. Dr Shalaby then shifted to Saudi Arabia and worked as a Pediatric and Neonatology Resident at Thadiq General Hospital and Al Yamamah Hospital respectively. Dr Shalaby is specialist in Indotracheal Intubation, Central Line Insertions (UAC & UVC), Chest Tube Insertion, Blood Exchange, Lubar Puncture.

Abstract:

The Composition of Breast Milk Mature human milk contains (FAT (high contents of palmitic &oleic acids 5%-3% PROTEIN (the principal proteins are casein 0.8-0.9%.CARBOHYDRATE calculated as 7.2%-6.9%.lactose,Mineral constitutes expressed as ash 0.2% & Its Energy content is 60- 75 kcal /100 ml. Is the natural first food for babies? It provides all the energy & nutrient that the infant needs for the first months of life,& it continues to provide up to half or more of a child” nutritional needs during the second half of the first year. What are the advantages of: FOR THE BABY? Breast milk contains the ideal nutrition for the infants in an easily digested form Vitamins.Protein.Fat& antibodies. It protects the infant against infectious & chronic. 1. Diseases as it contains antibodies .It promote sensory & cognitive development. 2. It reduces infant mortality due to common. 3. Childhood illness such as diarrhea or pneumonia 4. Finally, it is a secure way of feeding& safe for the environment. FOR THE MOTHER: 1. It helps the uterus to return to its pre-pregnancy size by stimulating oxytocin hormone release 2. It helps the loss of weight by burning extra calories. Also, it lowers the risk of breast & ovarian cancer. 3. It increases the bond between the mother & the baby by skin –to-skin touch contact. AAP RECOMMENDATIONS EXCLUSIVE BREAST FEEDING for 6 months TO enable mothers to establish &sustain exclusive breast feeding for 6 months WHO &UNICEF recommend to: 1. Initiation of breastfeeding within the first hour of life. 2. Exclusive breastfeeding that the infant only receives breast milk without any additional food or drink. 3. Breastfeeding on demand-that is as often as the child wants, day & night. 4. NO use of bottles, teats or pacifiers. What are the ABCs of Breastfeeding? A=Awareness Watch for the baby’s signs of hunger. This is called “on demand feeding, IN the first few weeks, may be times every 24 hours nursing 8-12. B= Be patient. Breastfeed as long as the baby wants to nurse each time. Infants typically breastfeed for 10-20 minutes on each breast. C = Comfort. This is key Relax while breastfeeding & the milk is more likely to “let down & flow”. MESSAGE TO TAKE HOME: EXCLUSIVE BREASTFEEDING FOR THE FIRST 6 MONTHS IS RECOMMENDED BY WHO

  • Pediatric Endocrinology
Speaker

Chair

Kendra Russell

Middle Georgia State University, USA

Speaker

Co-Chair

Victoria Munoz Martinez

Ciudad Real University Hospital, Spain

Speaker
Biography:

Dr. Gamila S.M.El-Saeed has completed her M.D from Medical University in Basic Science and Biochemistry from Cairo College, Egypt She has published more than 30 papers in international journals. She is a professor of Medical Biochemistry in National Research Centre, Egypt.

Abstract:

Background: The majority of studies on anemia, inflammation, and disturbances of iron metabolism have focused on patients in end-stage renal failure; this study aim was to investigate the relation ship between Carnitine and Hepcidin levels among the children of hemodialysis end stage renal disease (ESRD) and iron metabolism in them. Method: Thirty children with ESRD undergoing HD, and thirty healthy, age- and sex-matched children were included. Serum levels of iron, ferritin and total binding capacity (TIBC), hemoglobin, albumin (ALB) .Total L- Carnitine(LC), high-sensitivity C-reactive protein( hs CRP), hepcidin, were measured. Result: Abnormal serum inflammatory changes iron status and LC , were exhibited in HD children compared with healthy controls, Pearson’s correlation revealed a significant inverse correlation between hepcidin levels and ferritin, and positively with hsCRP and iron where serum albumin positively with hsCRP and ferritin , also a postive correlation found between LC and iron, ferritin.A multivariate regression analysis demonstrated a positive correlation between inflammatory risk marker hs CRP >3 mg/l) and hepcidin levels. Also a positive correlation was found between LC and iron levels. Conclusion: In children under hemodialysis, oral L-carnitine can increase serum albumin level and prevent CRP rising, beneficial effects of L-carnitine on anemia and, its supplementation is recommended for these patients. Malnutrition-inflammation complex is an incremental predictor in hemodialysis patients. Further studies are needed to assess whether modulating inflammatory or Nutritional processes can improve anemia management. Key words: Hepcidin ,L-Carnitine, Anemia, Inflammation ,Children, Hemodialysis.

Speaker
Biography:

Dr Shewikar Farrag is an Egyptian Doctor of Pediatric nursing who has completed her Ph.D from Sheffield University, UK in 2005and she is currently working as an Associate Prof at the Faculty of Nursing, Umm Al-Qura University, KSA. Dr Farrag was an international visiting scholar at the university of Wisconsin-Madison, USA in 2004 & an International Fellow at the Africa Regional Sexuality Resource Centre, Nigeria, 2007. A peer reviewer for Journal of Nursing Scholarship since 2006. Peer Reviewer for The Arab World Version of Kozier and Erb's Fundamentals of Nursing Text Book 2011. Editorial board member / Associate Editor at the Medical Journal of Umm Al-Qura University, KSA 2013.

 

Abstract:

The present study had the purpose for the evaluation of the health related quality of life (HRQoL) and self esteem (SE) of children &adolescents with diabetes mellitus type 1, analyzing the relation between these constructs in this population and comparing these results with those of non diabetic ones, and finding if there is association between metabolic control (Hb A1c) and these psychosocial correlates (HRQoL & SE). Materials &Methods: Generic Core Scales (GCS) were designed to measure the core health dimensions in both healthy and patient populations. PedsQL 3.0 diabetic module (DM) was developed to measure diabetes-specific HRQoL, for youths with T1DM. Hare Area-Specific Self-Esteem Scale, measures adolescents’ feelings about their worth and importance among peers, as students, and as family members. Results: The mean total HRQoL scale scores (child self report and parent-proxy reports) were 75.42, 72.37 for diabetics and 94.80, 96.83 for healthy ones, with significant difference (<0.001). Also, diabetics showed lower self esteem (2.31) than healthy ones (2.05) as higher scores indicate lower self esteem. Conclusion: Children with diabetes had lower quality of life than healthy ones in the physical, emotional and social domains. The SE and QoL concepts were correlated, i.e. the better the quality of life of diabetic children the higher the self-esteem.

  • Pediatric Psychology
Speaker
Biography:

Selen Ozakar Akca has received her PhD degree from Istanbul University Institute of Health Science with the thesis entitled “Risk-Taking Behaviours of Adolescents and The Effect of Nursing Practice on Substance Abuse in Accordance With Model of Change in Adolescents” in 2013. She has been working in Hitit University Health School since 2008.

Abstract:

Early diagnosis and prevention of risky behaviors of the youth, counseling and guidance services are among the important roles of professionals working with young people. In this study it was aimed to determine the sexual behavior, substance abuse and driving entertaining/motor vehicles attitudes of 16-18 years old young people, who constitute the most risky age range in the adolescence period. All young people in the 16-18 age group of vocational school (N=980) created the universe of the study, no sample selection was made and volunteers consisted the sample of the study (n=790). The questionnaire (QF) including young persons’ socio-demographic characteristics, sexual behaviours, substance abuse and driving entertaining/motor vehicles attitudes determining questions has been applied. Research data was evaluated with appropriate statistical methods. Average age value of young participants in the study was 17.36±0.2 years and all of them were male. It was determined that 73.4% of the youth had sexual intercourse and 61.1% did not receive education about healthy sexual life. It was seen that 43.5% of those think cigarettes are not harmful for health, 39.2% alcohol and 37.1% drugs/volatile substances. Furthermore it was determined that 14.1% of the youth participating in the study tried alcohol, 13.7% drugs/volatile subtances, 62% drive motor vehicles, 28.6% disregard traffic rules and 42.8% do not wear safety belts. It is remarkable that the sexual behaviour, driving entertaining/motor vehicles and subtance (cigarette, alcohol, drugs/volatile substances) use rate of the majority of young people in high schools is really high. In this regard the importance of ensuring cooperation with school administrators in order to identify risky behaviours of the young, plan appropriate interventions and taking necessary measures is obvious.

Speaker
Biography:

Marie Wilhsson is a PhD student since 2012 at School of Health and Welfare. His clinical background is in pediatric care, school nursing and psychiatric youth care.

Abstract:

Background: Stress among adolescents in Western societies is becoming an issue of increasing concern and the global trend of adolescents’ health shows a gradual deterioration that is independent of national differences and increases with age. Research shows that many adolescents report high levels of stress, associated with a change in expectations about performance and an increased focus on school results. Purpose/methods: The aim of this study was to explore the main concern of adolescents to get a deeper knowledge on how they cope with demands in everyday life. Grounded theory was used as a method to generate a model. Results: The core category “striving to be successful and to succeed” explains participants’ main concern in their everyday lives as a continuous process aiming for success in the present and to succeed throughout their lives. The category is what the participants describe as a race against time and can be divided into the two conceptual categories “struggling with time” and “separating life into different worlds”, pronouncing how they struggle and cope with their main concern in order to obtain wellbeing. Our results show a difference between how girls and boys cope with their demands. Conclusions: We show that girls and boys used different strategies to cope with stress in their everyday life. The results are based on adolescent’s experiences and are therefore an important contribution for initiating interventions aimed at promoting adolescents mental health from a gender perspective.

  • Pediatric Ophthalmology

Session Introduction

Clare Elizabeth Gilbert

London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, UK

Title: The role of nurses in the prevention of blindness from retinopathy of prematurity
Speaker
Biography:

Position: Professor of International Eye Health, London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine Qualifications: MB ChB; FRCOph; MD; MSc (Epi) Experience: Over 25 years experience of research in low and middle income countries, focussing on blinding eye diseases of children, including retinopathy of prematurity. First to describe the “third epidemic” of blindness due to ROP in middle income countries. Teaches on Masters in Public Health for Eye Care; currently supervising 5 PhD students Over 220 peer reviewed publications and more than 20 chapters. Clare is Research Advisor in Eye Health for Sightsavers, is a member of the Advisory Board of the Vision Impact Institute, is a Senior Advisor, USAID Child Blindness Program and Scientific Advisor to the Queen Elizabeth Diamond Jubilee Trust. Awards: American Academy of Ophthalmology’s International Prevention of Blindness Award (2011), Lighthouse International’s Pisart Vision Award (2012) and the L’Occitane Foundation’s Sight Award (2014).

Abstract:

The incidence of blindness from retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) is increasing, particularly in middle and low income countries as services for preterm infants expand. The annual incidence of blindness and visual impairment from ROP in 2010 was estimated to be 32,200 with the greatest number being in South Asia. Nurses can play a key role in reducing the risk of blindness from ROP, by counselling mothers at risk of preterm delivery to deliver in well equipped facilities and by reducing exposure of preterm infants to the known risk factors for ROP such as sepsis (hand washing and aseptic techniques); poorly administered and monitored supplemental oxygen (setting alarms correctly; responding to alarms appropriately); reducing stress (pain control, reduce unnecessary handling, swaddling and kangaroo care) and by promoting good nutrition (human breast milk). Nurses can prepare infants for screening for ROP and assist the ophthalmologist during examination, and can counsel parents of infants who need ongoing screening after discharge from the unit of the importance of attending the appointments.